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Organ, Eye and Tissue Donation

May 25, 2011


Every year, more than 1,500 people receive kidneys, livers, and hearts that have been donated for transplantation. However, with more than 10,000 New Yorkers still on waiting lists, the need for organ donations far exceeds the supply. One person who donates organs (hearts, lungs, liver, kidneys, pancreas and intestine) can save up to eight lives, while tissue donors (corneas, bone, skin, heart valves, tendons, veins, etc.) can improve 12 or more lives by restoring eyesight, helping fight infections in burn patients and prevent the loss of mobility and disability.

By enrolling in the Donate Life New York State Organ and Tissue Donor Registry, you are giving legal consent for the recovery of your organs, tissues and eyes for the purposes of transplantation and research at the time of your death.

Recent News

2014 National Minority Donor Awareness Week

July 30, 2014

National Minority Donor Awareness Week, celebrated annually August 1-7, is a nationwide observance to educate minorities of the desperate need for donation and transplantation within the multicultural community and how to register their decision to Donate Life. Approximately 64 percent of those on New York's transplant waiting list are minorities. While people of all ages and ethnicities can save and enhance lives through donation, organs are matched to recipients by a variety of factors—such as blood and tissue type—which can vary by race and ethnicity. While skin color is not a barrier when it comes to organ donations and transplants, the odds of a transplant being successful are much greater when a minority recipient receives an organ from a minority donor.


New York Alliance for Donation Applauds Creation of Public/Private Partnership for Administration of Donate Life Registry

April 8, 2014

Public/Private Partnership Saves Lives Of New Yorkers By Creating A User Friendly and Modernized Organ, Eye and Tissue Registry

ALBANY, NY April 8, 2014- The New York Alliance for Donation (NYAD) thanks Governor Cuomo and members of the NYS Senate and Assembly for taking decisive steps to improve the performance of the New York State Donate Life Registry. The 2014-15 State Budget allows for the transfer of administration of the state donor registry to a not-for-profit organization with experience facilitating organ, eye and tissue donation.

Governor Andrew Cuomo's State of the State Address Commits to Increasing Organ Donation

January 9, 2014

In his State of the State message delivered in Albany yesterday afternoon, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo included promotion of organ donation as one of the top healthcare priorities for the coming year.

The overall theme of the governor’s 2014 State of the State is “Building on Success.” Under the specific topic “Building Community: Health,” Mr. Cuomo referenced the creation of a public-private partnership with the organ donation community to increase enrollment in the New York State Donate Life Registry.

“New York has one of the lowest organ/tissue consent rates in the nation,” Mr. Cuomo said. In addition, he pointed out the New York donor registry “lags the country with an enrollment rate of 22 percent, compared to 45 percent reported by other states.”

“The New York Alliance for Donation (NYAD), a statewide organization which works to increase organ, eye and tissue donation in New York State through collaborative advocacy, education, promotion, and research, applauds Governor Cuomo’s proclamation in yesterday’s State of the State that increasing organ donation is a top health care priority for the coming year," said Aisha Tator, Executive Director of the non-profit organization.

Senator Carlucci, Lauren Shields Join in New Push to Allow Not-for-Profits to Administer Donate Life Registry in New York

June 5, 2013

On Heels of ‘Lauren’s Law’, Latest Effort will Promote Even Greater Enrollment, Streamline Registration Process

ALBANY, NY – Senator David Carlucci (D-Rockland/Westchester) today welcomed back organ donor champion Lauren Shields and advocacy groups to Albany in their latest effort to pass a sweeping overhaul of how the organ donation process is administered in New York State. In arguing for greater control over the Donate Life Registry for organ, eye, and tissue donation, advocates insist that legislators should support current legislation that would turn over its operation and promotion of the Donate Life Registry to a not-for-profit statewide organization that has experience working in organ donation. In doing so, this would continue a nationwide trend of other states that already have made the appropriate transition in contracting out these services.

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